Author Topic: Father's Day on the Bayou  (Read 593 times)

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Golden

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Father's Day on the Bayou
« on: June 17, 2012, 02:09:35 PM »
Went down to the Bayou this morning and fished a stretch on the golf course.  Had my slam within one hour.  I caught one of the most beautiful Chiclids I have ever seen.  I wish I had my camera phone with me then.  This fish was a dark purple and was one heck of a sightcast and catch.  10" fish at least. I really didn't photograph any of the ten or so bass I caught but you seen them before anyways.  I didn't catch any notables.  However you will see a couple of channel cats I caught.

Here is a pretty 'lil blue gill.

First one of the Morning.

Blurry but you get the picture.

The fight is one

Good Jumper too.

Here kitty kitty. Close up of Number two.

Here is the "Grip and Grin"


The two cats were both in the same hole and produced very hungry aggressive strikes too.  Had fun!


 
« Last Edit: June 17, 2012, 02:18:39 PM by Golden »
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Dave Kelly

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Re: Father's Day on the Bayou
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2012, 02:56:39 PM »
Are you just cast the food chain or are you using a special pattern to catch the channel cats?

Golden

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Re: Father's Day on the Bayou
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2012, 06:32:49 AM »
Well Dave I was using a #4 black bead head wooley booger.  The first strike occurred about a full two seconds after the fly hit the water while the fly was on the fall.  The second strike was different as the catfish slashed at it first, then followed the fly until I stopped it and jigged it in front of his face.  BOOM! I spoke with a guy who saw me catch the fish. He said a dude comes here sometimes during the day and feeds the fish bread at this location.  Maybe they thought it was feeding time when my fly hit the water... but I surely wasn't matching the color of bread throwing a black wooley booger.  I plan on returning in a couple of weeks and trying that spot again maybe I can catch one with the camera on movie mode!
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Dave Kelly

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Re: Father's Day on the Bayou
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2012, 09:15:06 AM »
  The second strike was different as the catfish slashed at it first, then followed the fly until I stopped it and jigged it in front of his face.  BOOM!

Reminds me of a trip my father and I made one Sat afternoon to the River ( funny what triggers 65 year old memories ). We had waded across the Colorado about a mile below Smithville.  As usual he and I took different directions once we were across  and on shore, casting Rex Spoons.

A couple hours later at meet up time/place, he has this 6 # or so small mouth on his stringer. Thus goes this tale. 

"He was standing at the base of a high sand bank in the bend of the river.  About a dozen feet out was a large log  buried in the sand about a foot under water. He had cast down current and just as he brought the spoon up over the log, this bass came with it. My dad stopped reeling. The bass stopped and seriously eyed the spoon laying there on bottom.

This is late summer, the rice flooding down stream in finished, the water level is low, and the water is gin clear.  The sun was at my dads back and he was casting a serious shadow across the fish. Any movement by the rod to jig/twitch the spoon would have scared it off. My father said he was afraid the movement of reeling in the slack of the line would be too much movement.

Using  his thumb he slowly turn the reel spool to take up the slack. The spoon moved barely a quarter inch - WHAM!"