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Topics - MattBlyth

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1
Outing Chat / Saltwater bass fishing in two places
« on: October 15, 2014, 12:36:10 PM »
Unfortunately I have been doing yet more traveling for work but it has given me the chance to do some more fishing in different places. At the end of September I was in Boston for a few days and took an evening charter to fish for stripers in boston harbor. We left the dock at about 5pm and fished into dark in the harbor, under the flight path into Logan airport. It was a beautiful, clear evening and we spent some time trying to locate the fish. I found one striper under a small pod of birds that hit a streamer and we marked some very big fish in a central channel that wouldnt eat. However as the sun set we found a huge flock of birds working over fish and I managed 7 stripers on a popper (white gurgler). Nothing huge but great fun. I also found out that Logan airport has a boat dock. The guides can pick up you early in the morning and drop you at the airport boat dock where a shuttle bus can take you straight to the terminal!! I fished with Boston Fishstix (www.bostonfishstix.com). The captains name is Richard Armstrong and I would recommend him if anyone is in that area. As you can see from the website they have tuna fishing options if you are there at the right time of year.







From Boston I had to go to Tokyo. Apart from the sushi (which is great!) I had been told about the japanese sea bass fishing in Tokyo harbor by two of the guys on the Mongolia trip. They fish for them at night with top waters under the harbor lights. I contacted I guide I was recommended and he picked me up from my hotel after work, we fished until about 11pm and then he dropped me back at the hotel! To say this was industrial fishing was an understatement - we were fishing right in the middle of refineries, processing plants and god knows what else. The smell was interesting at times. However whenever a warm water overflow entered the bay the bat fish were stacked up and there if there was a light on the water you could see the explosions as the bass hammered into them. We cast topwaters and small streamers and picked up several fish. They acted just like the stripers but were a solid bronze/gold color. They can apparently grow up to 3ft long but the big ones are hard to find. A new species on the fly and fun fishing! There are more options in Japan I would like to check out at some point - including sea run taimen in the far north.  Check out Trout and King Japan (http://www.troutandking.com/eng/)




2
Outing Chat / Mongolia Trip Report
« on: September 13, 2014, 08:28:40 PM »
As several of you know, I just got back from a trip to Mongolia chasing Taimen. Here is my trip report - lots of pictures so give it some time to load up.

I flew to Mongolia through Seoul and spent a few days in South Korea with my brother (who lives there) and his family. From there I took a Mongolian Airlines flight to Ulaanbataar (UB) - the capital of Mongolia. Mongolia has a population of almost 3m and about half of them live in the capital. Of those living in UB about half again still live in the traditional round ger's. its a crazy, mismatched city of new construction, crumbling soviet era concrete buildings and bad traffic. This was the view from my hotel room.



Interestingly this was the balcony of my hotel room - needless to say I didnt use it.



After a day in UB we took an internal flight about 300miles northwest to a town called Muron within 70 miles of the border with Russian siberia. As you exit the airport this is view. Thats right - the dirt tracks run right up to the airport entrance. Outside of that there is absolutely nothing!



Our rides were waiting at the airport (thankfully not horses)



And so began a 7hr journey on dirt tracks over mountains and valleys to get to the first camp on the river. Here are the views on the way





We made a beer stop in a small village where we also needed to pick up our permits for the river. We also had to pass through a military checkpoint but I wasnt allowed to snap pictures there. Some of you may recognize the dude in the shades.



After a long journey we pulled into camp 1 in the dark. Food, beer and a warm ger were waiting. In this morning we were up early to hit the river. This was my surprisingly luxurious accomodation.



The river we were fishing is called the Delger-Muron. it is part of a large drainage system that eventually flows north into Lake Baikal in Siberia, the largest body of freshwater in the world. The company we went with is called Fish Mongolia and this year they had entered into a partnership with another operator (Mongolia River Outfitters) and so we had guides and camp crew that had been with both companies. We were 8 anglers and 4 guides. 3 of the guides were chilean (they spent the mongolian winter fishing the chilean summer and vice versa) and the 4th was a local mongolian. We fished for 6 days - starting at 8am and finishing between 7 and 9:30pm depending upon the length of the float for the day. It was almost entirely a drift boat fishing trip as we covered 100miles of river in the 6 days. The guides were all excellent.

Here are the boats - really stable and loads of room



The scenery was spectacular - the river was clear and low and every bend on the river presented views like these













So the fishing! There are three target species in this river. The first is the lenok trout. This is a genuine trout but it has an odd low-slung mouth more likea grayling. They can grow well over 20in and they rise to hoppers like they havent fed in weeks. I had several fish leap clear out of the water and then dive down on the hopper. They fight like demons too. The other is grayling. It appeared there were two species in the river - the mongolian and the arctic. The mongolian grayling has a smaller dorsal than the beautiful arctic. We caught many of both, however this is the only place I have been where you put a 20plus inch trout back as soon as you can as its not what you were after! If you dedicated time to the trout and grayling completely you could easily reach a triple digit day if you wanted to.

(Photo Kelvin Ng)



(Photo Kelvin Ng)

Obviously what everyone comes for is the Taimen. You see pictures in all the magazines of monster fish and tales of great fishing. What they dont tell you is the taimen fishing is hard!! Really hard! Firstly the flies are huge - the streamers are 6-8in long and very heavy, tied on copper tubes and many of them with lead eyes to boot. Secondly its a lot of blind casting - i mean A LOT. We probably made many hundred casts a day, all day every day. All of us had hand cramps, blisters and sore joints by the end of it :) Casting the giant poppers was a relative relief. While were were there the river was considerably lower than normal and much clearer due to little rain. The taimen were spooky and reluctant to eat. The group the week before us only managed 12 taimen all week - we managed 27 with everyone catching at least one taimen. The majority were small though - between 20 and 30". We did have two big fish caught. Here is a picture of Mike Seigman tied up to a 40in fish



He was quite happy when it got in the net!



With very good reason!





My first taimen seemed positively small in comparison!!! However as all the mongolians say "Taimen is Taimen"



Unfortunately I did not manage a big one - my fish were all about the size of the first one. The big ones are there though - I saw them. On the last day we were rowing through a shallow, slow flat when we drifted right on top of a monster. He took off from the side of the boat and pushed a big bow wave right across the river. it was hard to say how big he was but I would not be surprised if it was pushing 60in.





Kelvin took top honors with most fish and the biggest - this stunning 44in beauty.

(Photo Kelvin Ng).

Even if the Taimen fishing was not as easy as we hoped it was still a fantastic trip. We fished hard all day and then laughed hard all evening - it was a great group of anglers and we had a blast. The food was good, with hot meals cooked on the river bank each day by the guides and drinks and dinner waiting for us when we reached the next camp. As this was a float trip everything except the yurts came with us each day. The camp staff would wait for us to leave, then pack down the entire camp from the dinner tent to the latrines, load it all in rafts and then paddle down river to have everything set up at the next camp by the time we got there. It was much more comfortable and well run than I was expecting for sure. We even had vodka tonics waiting for us as we got out of the boats!





















Here is a group shot - anglers, guides and camp staff


So all in all an amazing trip - great company, great fishing and a totally beautiful river in wild and still unspoilt countryside. I need to go back to find that big fish. Anyone want to go?
Cheers
Matt

3
General Discussion / Fishing in Abu Dhabi
« on: May 13, 2014, 04:33:21 PM »
As we have a lot of other oilfield folks in the club - has anyone done any saltwater fishing around Abu Dhabi on their travels? The beaches around there look great and I would have thought there was something to catch in the surf but the info on google is very limited.

Cheers
Matt

4
General Discussion / The Drake magazines year long species contest
« on: April 25, 2014, 04:37:31 PM »
Does anyone else from the club want to join me in attempting this competition?

Cheers
Matt

Starting Sat., April 26th (Opening day of trout season for several states), post a picture of you with your fish on The Drake’s Facebook page (there’ll be a special spot for entries). Whoever posts the most different species of fish, that they caught between April 26, 2014, and April 25th, 2015 (Mountain Standard Time), on a fly rod, will be the Grand Prize winner. There will also be monthly and quarterly winners, with some great prizes (rods, reels, line, coolers, sunglasses, gear) provided by the sponsors below.

THREE IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER:
1) You must use the hashtag #DrakemagBigYear when entering via Twitter or Instagram, for us to be able to track your entry. For Facebook entries, join the contest via The Big Year link provided on the The Drake Magazine Facebook page. (We’re using a third-party app called OfferPop).

2) While the fish can be from anywhere in the world, we are using the IGFA list of species. So, for example, a "cutthroat trout" is considered one species—even if you catch one Snake River Cutty and one Colorado Cutty, it’s still just one cutty.

3) This is a catch-and-release competition, so each fish must be alive and be properly handled in the photos. Also, like the birding version, we are using the honor system. If the fish you post was caught before April 26th, 2014, it is not eligible. No cheating!

THE TWO MAIN GOALS OF THIS EVENT:
1) To have fun while winning cool gear.

2) To showcase how many different types of fish can be caught on a fly rod.

This is not a "biggest fish" contest or a "most fish" contest, it’s a variety-of-species contest. For a more detailed explanation of the rules, and to see some of the prizes, and how to win them, visit drakemag.com.


Thanks, and good luck!

.      

5
Events and Information / More trout in the classroom pictures
« on: April 16, 2014, 03:14:30 PM »
Some more pictures of the TFF micro-steelhead
Matt








6
Events and Information / 2014 Trout in the Classroom Release Day
« on: April 14, 2014, 11:49:34 AM »
Folks

The release day for our 2014 TITC fish has been set for May 10th in Sattler, TX. We will have students and teachers from the 3 high schools present, along with the local GRTU reps to help us release our approximately 250 trout. If any TFF'ers want to join us you would be more than welcome - and we could certainly use the help! Message me for more details.

Here are some updated pictures of the fish from Mayde Creek HS

Cheers
Matt






7
Events and Information / Oil Spill in Galveston Bay
« on: March 23, 2014, 10:01:18 AM »
Folks

For those who may not have heard, there was a barge collision in Galveston Bay yesterday that has released an, as yet unknown, amount of marine fuel oil into the bay. The barge was carrying a million gallons but only one tank is believed to have spilled.

Details below

http://www.abc27.com/story/25047195/crews-try-to-contain-oil-spill-in-galveston-bay

8
Some disturbing reading on Texas water rights with particular mention of the Devils River and threat to its supply.

http://www.texasmonthly.com/story/how-rick-perry-can-solve-our-water-problem/page/0/1

9
Events and Information / 2014 Trout in the Classroom Project
« on: January 15, 2014, 10:43:17 PM »
Folks

The 2014 TFF sponsored trout in the classroom project is underway with 3 tanks this year - katy HS, Mayde Creek HS and Cinco Ranch HS. Eggs were delivered to the schools on Friday and the first fish started hatching today. I will update the conservation page with pictures shortly.

And yes they are steelhead strain trout again this year!

Cheers
Matt

10
General Discussion / 8lbs 6oz Catch of the Weekend
« on: September 22, 2013, 01:23:34 PM »
Managed to land this 8lbs 6oz, 20 1/2 incher on Saturday morning. Mother and baby doing well!

Oh and his name is Jack!


11
Outing Chat / Port O'Connor Jack Crevalle
« on: July 21, 2013, 08:29:14 PM »
Brett Walker and I went out with Brent Hodges in Port O'Connor this past Saturday to do a little pre-fishing for the One Fly :) The reds were fairly uncooperative due to a combination of dirty water, clouds and the biggest fishing/party tournament I have ever seen with Poco Bueno in full swing.
However the jetties were fairly empty and the seas were calm enough that we made it out there in the beavertail with no issues. We saw one big school of tarpon busting on the top but they disappeared before we could get to them. However blind casting giant mullet patterns at the jetties produced several nice jacks and on two separate occasions something that pulled an entire fly line and a serious chunk of backing through the rocks before busting through 40lb fluoro and leaving deep score marks in my fly line. Wish I had seen what it was. Jack pictures below:

Matt




















12
If anyone wants to do a little guided prefishing for the Saltwater One Fly then Brent Hodges (Reelfly Adventures) has openings in Port O'Connor for guided days the week of July 22-25th. As anyone who has fished with Brent on the Guad knows he works his ass off all day to get his clients on fish. I can personally vouch that the same applies when he is on a poling platform too...and in true club fashion he has a Beavertail. If you talk nicely to Ashley then I believe there maybe a TFF discount on the cost.

Check out http://reelfly.net/news/open-days-for-saltwater-trips

Cheers
Matt

13
All - from the GBF

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Seafood Consumption Advisory on Spotted Seatrout Removed for Most of Galveston Bay

Webster, TX – July 1, 2013 – The Galveston Bay Foundation (“GBF”) celebrates the removal of the seafood consumption advisory on spotted seatrout (speckled trout) for most of the Galveston Bay system, including a portion of Upper Galveston Bay and all of Trinity, Lower Galveston, East, West, Chocolate, Drum, Bastrop, and Christmas bays. This large area is south of a line from Red Bluff Point to Five Mile Cut Marker to Houston Point in Upper Galveston Bay. According to the Texas Department of State Health Services, testing of the speckled trout samples indicated that concentrations of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), both of which are groups of toxic compounds, had decreased to acceptable levels and no longer pose a significant health risk.

This latest testing is a snapshot in time and there is still much work to be done to further reduce risks from the consumption of seafood in areas of the bay system, most notably the upper portion of Upper Galveston Bay, the Houston Ship Channel, and the San Jacinto River. We hope to see a long-term decrease in the concentrations of toxins in seafood as sources of these “legacy pollutants” are identified and eliminated. For almost three years, GBF has worked to ensure that a major dioxin hotspot, the San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund site (SJRWP) on the San Jacinto River at Interstate 10, is cleaned up as fast as possible. GBF has worked with local, state, and federal agencies, industry, and other non-profit organizations to ensure this site has been capped and eliminated as a source of dioxin to the bay and its seafood. We continue to work to ensure appropriate long-term clean-up of the site occurs and will work to uncover and clean up other abandoned waste pits or areas, such as Patrick Bayou on the Houston Ship Channel.

About Galveston Bay Foundation
The mission of the Galveston Bay Foundation is to preserve, protect, and enhance the natural resources of the Galveston Bay estuarine system and its tributaries for present users and for posterity. The Foundation was incorporated in 1987, and is a non-profit organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. GBF is located at 17330 Highway 3 in Webster, Texas. For further information, contact GBF at 281-332-3381 or visit the website at www.galvbay.org.

14
Outing Chat / Guide needed for New Orleans
« on: May 29, 2013, 12:47:32 PM »
Does anyone know a good conventional fishing guide in the New Orleans area? I have clients wanting to fish in late June during a conference in NOLA. No fly fishing needed  - but I good guide is a must.

Cheers
Matt

15
Events and Information / Trout in the Classroom Release Day
« on: May 09, 2013, 12:57:43 PM »
Folks

We will be releasing the trout from the trout in the classroom project tanks into the Guadalupe on Saturday May 18th. If anyone from the club is interested in driving down with us saturday morning and helping with the release please let me know.

Cheers
Matt








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